Cafeteria Full of Words

October 28, 2008 at 9:39 pm 2 comments

Imagine that you invite a school full of 11- to 14-year-olds to try something fundamentally crazy, like write an entire novel in a month. Kids don’t like to write, they don’t like the idea of novels, and they sure don’t like the idea of big projects with scary deadlines. You know that there will be a few kids like yourself who get all geeked out on the idea of being authors, but you figure that you’re going to end up with a dozen ambitious little writers, tops. So you make a few posters, send out an announcement, and plan a twenty-minute meeting at the end of the day. The only available room is the cafeteria, so you pull down two folding tables and let your disinterested Advisory take all the good seats.

What do you even think when somewhere in the neighborhood of 200 kids show up?

Dude. DUDE.

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Entry filed under: FUN STUFF.

Unpleasantly Small World Dodgeball, Part One

2 Comments Add your own

  • 1. East Coast Teacher  |  November 2, 2008 at 8:38 am

    That’s awesome!

    Have a blast : )

    Reply
  • 2. scoop2go  |  November 10, 2008 at 10:54 pm

    COOOOOOLLLLLL!!!!!!!! Yay, you! And I’ll be praying for ya….

    Reply

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The Bee’s Knees

This is the teaching journal of a student first-year second-year THIRD-YEAR (!!!) English teacher. I am writing this blog as a reflection for myself, a way to keep friends and family updated, and a sharing-ground between other educators online. I love comments!

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